Security Poster Library

When I was a young security practitioner, I looked everywhere for free material to use in my organization's security awareness and education program. Along the years my collection grew, some I made and others I can't recall where I got it from. In hopes to help other security practitioners, Security Checks Matter gathered up digital copies of my security posters collection (the good, the bad, and the cheesy) and placed them in this electronic library for all. Feel free to use in any security awareness and education program. All I ask in return is a link back, a shout out, or recommendation to others. If any of these materials helped you out please drop me a note in the comments section to let me know. I love to hear success stories. If you have any posters you would like to contribute let me know (of course credit will be given to you), I'm always looking to expand the collection. Thanks!

As a note, you can see the Security Checks Matter designed security poster in one collection location.

Since it appears I reached the max capacity level for a page, I'm breaking down the Security Poster Library into collections. This allows me to add more posters as I get them and allows you to find them easier. Unfortunately, this will take some time as I have over 500 images to sort through, so please bare with me.

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Current collections:
Click on image to view our OPSEC page 
Click on image to view our
Christmas & Winter
themed security posters

Main collection.

Using security from the start puts you the road to success

For a strong foundation, don't forget to include security in the design.

Travel Brief security poster
Before traveling to far off destinations, go to security for your defensive travel briefing. Know before you go!




"He who defends everything defends nothing." - Frederick the Great. A great reminder to practice security risk management principles.

security poster
Including security in the planning process can help you stay on track. Consult security early and often.
safe forms
SF 702, Security Container Check Sheet instructions





I'm sure there are better ways to disguise sensitive information, but we don't have a big budget.



Loose-talk costs lives, in taxis, on the phone, in clubs and bars, at football matches, at home with friends, anywhere. Whatever you say - say nothing.


Google Nigeria, please enter your bank account number and search for inheritance. Don't be a victim to the Nigerian 419 scam.








Don't let bad OPSEC blow a good operation.

OPSEC starts with you, end with you!

We don't pay much attention to information security. We're hoping our competitors will steal our ideas and become as unsuccessful as we are.

 






OPSEC
Wanted for murder! Her careless talk costs lives. Loose lips sink ships.

Uncle Sam wants you to cover your badge when outside of secure areas.


soldier
Practice safe SECS. OPSEC, COMSEC, INFOSEC, PERSEC. Keep it under wraps!

soldier
Think before you say (or post!) something stupid. How about a nice big cup of shut the hell up!

"Careless Fires...Let's Keep Them All Out...
"Careless Fires...Let's Keep Them All Out For Victory" - NARA - 516296 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)




Be aware of your surroundings
It is not always so easy to spot them. Be aware of your surroundings and anyone overhearing your conversations.

security poster
It is not always so easy to spot them. Be aware of your surroundings and anyone overhearing your conversation.





mask security poster
Great security poster for Mardi Gras or Halloween to remind people to practice their security responsibilities.


security poster
Hit a grand slam when you make security part of the plan. Use this baseball themed security poster to remind your workforce to incorporate security into their planning process.

security poster
Another cute baseball themed security poster. Make a catch with security.








Vintage WW II poster reminding people to avoid discussing sensitive information over the phone, since phone conversations are highly prone to eavesdropping.


Access control is based on something you know and something you have.

Security Poster
Don't get hooked by phishing tricks.

OPSEC! It's not just for breakfast anymore. It's great day or night.

Sometimes they are that obvious. Historically spies have presented big indicators that were often overlooked by co-workers and supervisors.
A little reminder to conduct security double-checks.


A short little rhyme to keep your mouth shut and practice good OPSEC.

Let people know that their security officer is there to help.


The Dynamic Duo of Batman and Robin come together for an OPSEC poster to remind people not to talk about sensitive information outside of secure areas...to include car pools.
This poster is a product of its time period when big ol' USSR was the USA's main enemy. This could be slightly modified to show that Mother Russia Bear is no longer hibernating.

When traveling, try to blend into your surroundings and don't paint yourself as a target of opportunity. The poster shows an array of organization t-shirts and paraphernalia from the USA's Intelligence Community.

A security poster using the villains from the classic cartoon, "Rocky and Bullwinkle," to highlight the continual existence of foreign intelligence services.


Clearly a poster from the 80s featuring the commercial sensation, The California Raisins.  You may have to explain this poster if you have a younger audience.

Security requires everybody to be part of the solution. This poster poses the question if the individual is posing the risk to the organization's security.


Old WWII poster that could be used today.


Security is a 24/7, around the clock job.


For an audience familiar with the literary classic, Don Quixote.

See something, say something.

An anti-terrorism poster reminding that complacency kills, keep vigilant!



Are badges alone enough to gain access? The poster gets people thinking about access control and need-to-know. It probably requires an accompanying article to explain it.

A Defensive Travel Briefing...Don't leave home without it.

Ernest goes abroad. The opposition is always listening. Don't forget your travel briefing before traveling.

Foreign travel? Check first with security. Travel briefing reminder.

foreign travel brief reminder
Security - Your passport for foreign travel. Foreign travel reminder security poster.


foreign travel brief reminder
Before you shuttle off on foreign travel, check with security. Foreign travel reminder security poster.
Travel briefing reminder.


An access control poster to encourage people to challenge unknown people in their area.




Security should have a seat in any organization's planning.




A simple reminder to only discuss sensitive information in approved secure areas.


Practice security discipline because you never know what the adversary may see.

One man's trash is another man's treasure. Practice good security to mitigate the TRASHINT threat.

Take the time to do your security procedures right.

Travel briefing reminder.


Travel brief reminder.

Travel brief reminder.

Halloween security poster. 

Reminds people that they're part of the security solution.


Security is everybody's top priority.

Think defensively before it's too late. Security is should be a part of any organization's program.

Vigilance starts with everybody.

Practice good phone security, don't discuss sensitive information over unsecure lines.


Security is the responsibility of everybody, not just the security office.

An old Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) security poster reminding people not to gamble with their security measures.

Everybody plays a roll in protecting an organization from security violation.

This poster features the famous FBI spy, Robert Hanssen.

Featuring the zodiac signs, this poster shows that security is part of everybody's horoscope.

A different spin on the zodiac signs to show that each individual plays a role in security all year long.

Clean desk policy and other housekeeping rules help keep security violations at bay.

An OPSEC poster showing there are more dangers below the tip of the iceberg.

Complacency and indifference to security procedures are root causes of security violations.







Information warriors are not always easy to spot.

You are the key to security.


A security poster feature David Lettermen and his famous top ten count down.

Security is a serious matter.

Don't discuss sensitive information outside of secure areas. You never know who could be listening in on your conversation. Perhaps somebody with ill-intent?

An old DIA poster to remind people of their end-of-day checks requirement.

The sounds of using your security locks properly.

Don't discuss sensitive information outside of secure areas. Lunch rooms and break areas are not approved areas.

If you want to win the security game, you need to care enough to play.

A vintage OPSEC poster to remind people not to discuss sensitive information outside of secure areas.


Before you give access, verify they have the need-to-know and proper clearance.







For nostalgic video gamers, a pac-man inspired security poster reminding you not to play games when it comes to computer security.

Practice makes perfect. Aim for the target - no security violations!

Pros don't spill in any profession. Leaking sensitive information is unprofessional, regardless of your field.

Reduce extra copies, decrease cost, increase security. Reducing unneeded copies of papers with sensitive information means less documents you need to protect. This reduces security costs and makes it easier to protect your information.


Everybody plays a role in an organization's security program.

Security is worth doing time and time again.

When making plans, don't forget to incorporate security into them.

security poster
No matter what angle you're coming from, security involves everybody. 




The only classified information that's no secret. The newspaper classifieds are the only classified information you should share.


Let security be your guide in setting your course. Security - the best course to follow.

let security be your guiding light through the right processes and procedures
Let Security be your guiding light...

Seek security help before its too late. Don't let things build up to the point it snows you over.

A vintage security poster demonstrating you may be throwing out valuable treasure in your trash. One man's trash can be another man's treasure!

Security. Together we win. Security truly is a team effort requiring everybody's involvement.

The major security incidents that have occurred in the Department of Defense over the past 15 years could have been prevented if supervisors and co-workers practiced the security policies and procedures. Don't become complacent, tighten security practices.
You should think about security applications.

Security involves everybody to participate.


Freedom isn't free...Do your part, practice good security!

A security poster featuring Smokey the Bear with a slight twist on his famous line.

Protect your indicators and signals by practicing good OPSEC measures.





Don't be the weakest link.

Listen to Uncle Sam. You've got what it takes soldier. Now take care of what you've got!
People can be part of the solution when breaking the terrorist planning cycle by simply reporting suspicious activity. Be part of the solution. Break the Terrorist 7 step planning cycle.



Playing on the famous line from "A Few Good Men" to remind people to shred documents with sensitive information when it is no longer needed. You can handle the shredding! Maintain OPSEC. Think. Protect. OPSEC.


I don't always see suspicious activity. But when I do, I report it through iWATHCH. He is the most secure man in the world!
An iWATCH poster featuring the famous Internet meme of the Dos Equis man.


The terrorist planning cycle.





An Anti-terrorism Awareness Month poster featuring the terrorist threat our military faces overseas.

Another Anti-terrorism Awareness Month poster feature a recent terrorism case highlighting the threat our military faces while overseas.

Cyber Security Dos and Don'ts.


An Anti-terrorism Awareness Month poster featuring a historical terrorist vignette highlighting the continued terrorism threat.

Halloween security poster to remind people to protect the sensitive information they are entrusted with.


An Anti-terrorism Awareness Month poster featuring a historical terrorism vignette highlighting how terrorism can strike anyone, anywhere.

No security poster library is complete without a completely cheesy poster that leaves you scratching your head and wondering if the security officer gets out much.


An Anti-terrorism Awareness Month poster featuring a historical terrorism vignette demonstrating how terrorist can strike anyone, anywhere.

Report suspicious activity.


An Anti-terrorism Awareness Month poster featuring a historical terrorism vignette demonstrating how terrorist can strike anyone, any where.

Simple physical security poster to remind people not to entice burglars by leaving valuables in their cars.

An Anti-terrorism Awareness Month poster featuring a historical terrorism vignette that demonstrates how terrorism can strike anyone, any where.

Cyber security awareness poster reminding people of simple online security procedures.


Stay vigilant to the subtle indicators.

Share a ride not your secrets
Add caption
Carpool vans are not approved for discussions on sensitive topics. Practice safe OPSEC measures.

cheesy security poster don't discuss sensitive information outside secure areas
Cheesy DIA poster reminding people not to use carpool as another classified work area.

black and white security cartoon security manager's rant
The security manager rant.

A subtle reminder of the costly alternatives. This should near the bean counters.

Fax machines sound old, but there are still locations using them.

black and white security cartoon
Reminder to use approved systems to transfer sensitive information.

black and white security cartoon
Simple access control measure. Need-to-know plus clearance.

black and white security cartoon
A little reminder to sanitize work spaces after working with classified.

An old poster reminding people the importance of back-ups.

Secure fax machines (the beastly dinosaurs) still exist. If you have one, stick this poster up to remind senders of the importance of verifying recipients before sending.



Endorse and apply the need to know principle



Prior to releasing classified information, verify need-to-know and clearance.




Protecting our country is everybody's responsibility and you can do that by reporting suspicious activity.


There is colored version towards the beginning of the library, but the black-and-white version is available as well.

Excessive travel is a potential indicator of espionage. This poster helps educate the workforce on reportable indicators.

A little reminder on applying the need-to-know principle. Just because somebody has a clearance, doesn't mean they have the need to know the information.



sleeping giant security poster
A security poster take on the literary classic, Rip Van Winkle.

 
Security awareness and education must include management in order to have an effective program.

This poster highlights the importance of security awareness and education. If done right, it will improve your overall program.
Even though bellies get full by eating too much at Thanksgiving, you can never have too much security awareness.

Report suspicious activity.




Security is an investment into the organization's future.

Security poster reminding security is everybody's job
Security is everybody's job.



Choose your words carefully.


 St. Patrick's Day security poster.

Security programs rely on everybody doing their part and carrying out their security duties.



A security manager is there for people to "bug" with their security related questions. Security managers, if you're answer the same questions multiple times, that's your indicator that you have a security awareness problem.




Don't ignore security violations.


Suspicious behavioral indicators that should reported to authorities.








Thanksgiving security poster to remind people not to be complacent in their security duties.

Halloween security poster reminding people that they play an important role in the security program.

















Foreign Intelligence Services still pose a threat. It's not just a Cold War threat.

Security is a team effort. Have you done your part? Security Awareness


Security risk management. Balancing the scales

Are you prepared for success? Include security in your plans.




DIA poster reminds everybody that a strong security program gives us a peace of mind.



Dangers of couriering material. While today's threats are not like the Wild West, couriers should know the current threats and proper procedures to mitigate it.

Double wrapping classified before couriering

Don't gamble with your security clearance because you could lose.

An April Fools Day security poster warning about the foolishness of conducting espionage.


A little security poem with a moral of "Everybody blamed Somebody when Nobody did what Anybody could have done."




Halloween security poster.


.

NSA Information Security poster.

NSA information security poster.

NSA information security poster.

Security is everybody's responsibility. This poster urges all personnel to do their part in the security program.



Another spin-off of the WWII era "loose lips sink ships" OPSEC poster, which is updated to today's cyber environment.

Labeling classified provides us clear signs of the type of information we're dealing with.


Marking material is an important part of any information security program.






See something suspicious, say something. Don't just sit there, trust your instincts. Be aware. Be involved. Be safe.






Halloween security poster reminding people about conducting their annual Top Secret inventory.




Vintage security poster.


Know your security responsibilities



On one side is the US space shuttle version and on the other side is the Russian's. This poster implies that the Russians obtained the design through espionage techniques to include dumpster diving.





Poster to remind people to use only authorized copy machines for reproducing classified information.



Reminder about wearing your badge as part of the access control program. It also subtly encourages people to challenge individuals without badges.


Make a catch with security and this adorable baseball playing teddy bear security poster.

A friendly reminder to not wait until the last minute to get your security paperwork through.


Used to remind people about the Two Person Integrity (TPI) rule. Usually only used in highly sensitive areas.



Travel briefings reminder.








Really old computer security poster (see floppy disk on it?) reminding people to comply with license agreements.


















Security is not complete without you. Everybody is part of security.








The spies throughout the past few decades can testify that espionage does not pay.

Reminder of personnel security reporting requirements in order to maintain a security clearance.

Safeguarding valuable assets is not a new security practice. If they can do it on the football field, you can do it in the office environment.

The FBI Fraud alert that provides 10 red-flags that you could be part of a scam.

Keep a watchful eye and report ineffective security immediately. This poster provides a blank to advertise the security officer's contact information.

Where is your badge? A security poster to encourage people to wear their badge and to challenge individuals without badges. It's the same as the other one with the fighting polar bears, except this one has falling snow.


















Holiday reminder to don't forget your end of day checks.

Holiday theme security reminder.

Holiday recruitment to entice people to be security watch dogs.
























Security is the only antidote

Keep your security program on track.























CTRL + ALT + DELETE before you leave your seat.







Practice need-to-know principle.


Report unattended bags. See something say something.


Use your individual protective measures.

Counting on all sets of eyes to report all suspicious activity. See something, say something.





Don't forget to make your Security New Year's Resolutions


Unzip your lips to say something when you see something suspicious. 





Traveling to far distance lands? Don't forget to report all overseas travel in advance to security.


Don't ruin your paper shredder by being too lazy to remove paper clips, staples, and other metal pieces. The metal ruins the blades.


Every once and a while we need a poster to remind us, "See something suspicious, say something."

A simple reminder to keep prohibited items out of closed/restricted areas.











Thanksgiving themed security poster to remind people not discuss sensitive information in public settings.

Password security poster.

Patriotic themed security poster featuring the 2nd Continental Congress. It's a great poster to show near Presidents' Day in February or 4th of July Independence Day.



NATO security poster. Whether you are coming or going, always think of security.

NATO security poster. The whole point of security is protection; protection of information, assets, and jobs!

NATO security posters. Great use in reminding people about the local escort policy, "never leave visitors unattended."

NATO security poster reminding people whether you are coming or going, always think security.

NATO security poster reminding people to be security conscious.



Don't toss sensitive information in the trash. Your toss is all of our loss. Shred it instead.











Before you leave, make sure you properly secure all classified material.

It's not nice to fool mother nature or security. Don't try to hide or fool with security!

Remind people with this baseball themed security, "don't get caught short. Contact security today to help you with your next play."


standard form 701 SF 701 instructions

1 comment:

  1. during the poster sessions and gave out quite a few business cards. My co-presenter was not able. logo design

    ReplyDelete